Can You Use a Reverse Mortgage to Buy Your Next Home? Yes, and Here’s How

Most people who have been on the market for a home are familiar with what the term ‘mortgage’ means, but many have not heard of a reverse mortgage and aren’t aware of how this product can benefit them. If you’re nearing retirement and are contemplating a new home or even relocation to another community, here are the details on a reverse mortgage and how this option may benefit you.

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Can You Use a Reverse Mortgage to Buy Your Next Home? Yes, and Here's HowMost people who have been on the market for a home are familiar with what the term ‘mortgage’ means, but many have not heard of a reverse mortgage and aren’t aware of how this product can benefit them. If you’re nearing retirement and are contemplating a new home or even relocation to another community, here are the details on a reverse mortgage and how this option may benefit you.

What Is A Reverse Mortgage?

While many homeowners may not have the net worth to be able to buy another home without selling their current one, a reverse mortgage enables the buyer to borrow money against the value of their home. Created in 2009 as the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM), this type of mortgage can enable those older than 62 to relocate to a new house or move closer to their family without having to sacrifice the money they’ve saved or their fixed monthly income.

What Are The Requirements?

Beyond the minimum age requirement of 62 years of age, those who would like to utilize a reverse mortgage must either own the current property they are living in or have a high amount of equity in the property. They must be able to pay all of the costs associated with ownership of the home and the property they are purchasing must be able to pass the standards held by the Federal House Administration (FHA). In addition, applicants will have to go through a financial assessment to ensure they can make insurance and property tax payments.

The Benefits And Drawbacks Of Reverse Mortgages

A reverse mortgage can be a great benefit in that it enables those who are in their senior years to purchase a new home without having to utilize a portion of their fixed monthly income. However, because a reverse mortgage includes this benefit, it also comes in tandem with a higher loan balance and this higher balance means that interest will accrue more quickly. Dependent on this amount, this can actually diminish the equity in the home.

While the opportunity for a reverse mortgage has been around for a number of years, this alternative for purchasing a home has not been utilized by many homeowners since its inception in 2009. If you’re approaching your senior years and are considering the benefits of purchasing a new home, you may want to contact your local mortgage professional for more information.

Are You Ready to Refinance Your Mortgage? Learn How to Do a Quick Refinancing Self-Assessment

If you’ve been considering refinancing recently and are wondering how to come to a decision, here are some questions you should ask yourself before wading into the water.

Are You Ready to Refinance Your Mortgage? Learn How to Do a Quick Refinancing Self-AssessmentWhether you’ve decided to renovate your home or you would like to consolidate your debt, refinancing your mortgage can be an option in times of money trouble; however, it’s important to know whether or not this is the right step for you. If you’ve been considering refinancing recently and are wondering how to come to a decision, here are some questions you should ask yourself before wading into the water.

Do You Have The Extra Time?

It may sound silly, but looking into the details of financing your mortgage can take up a lot of time, and if it’s going to be stressful or tax your abilities too much, you may want to hold off until things change. Because there are so many details associated with refinancing, and the security of your largest investment hangs in the balance, it’s important to have the time to research and understand all the small stuff so you don’t fall victim to a bad loan or confusing mortgage terms.

What’s My Interest Rate?

It’s entirely possible that refinancing may not be worth it if you can’t get the interest rate you’re expecting, so don’t be taken in by low rates you may have come across. Because many unreliable lenders will offer the lowest rate to get your business, it’s a good idea to do the research and go with someone you can trust. Your credit score and financial standing will have a lot to do with the rate you qualify for, but if the interest isn’t as low as you’ve calculated, it may not be a beneficial financial decision in the end.

Will This Help My Financial Situation?

No one decides to move forward with a mortgage refinancing without thinking that it’s a good financial decision, and that’s why it’s so important to carefully weigh all of the variables before deciding refinancing is for you. From a job loss to a home relocation, there are many things that come up in life that we are not always financially prepared for, so make sure to consider as many possible pros and cons as you can before moving forward with this option.

Many people think that refinancing their mortgage will improve their financial situation and eliminate their debt, but it’s important to consider all of the outcomes of this choice before coming to any final decision. If you’re currently considering refinancing, you contact your local mortgage professional for more information.

The Pros and Cons of Borrowing the Down Payment for Your Next Home

With the rising cost of real estate, many people feel that now is a good time to buy a home to ensure a good financial future. However, if you haven’t saved up enough money to make a down payment, it’s possible you may be considering whether or not you should borrow the funds. If you’re considering a loan from friends or family, here are some points you may want to think about before asking for a loan.

The Pros and Cons of Borrowing the Down Payment for Your Next HomeWith the rising cost of real estate, many people feel that now is a good time to buy a home to ensure a good financial future. However, if you haven’t saved up enough money to make a down payment, it’s possible you may be considering whether or not you should borrow the funds. If you’re considering a loan from friends or family, here are some points you may want to think about before asking for a loan.

Getting Out Of The Rental Market

With even the rental market seeing huge increases in its rental rates, buying a home can be an even more beneficial purchase then ever. While your rental check is gone once you’ve paid it each month, payments on your mortgage will become a part of the wealth you’re building and the equity in your home. It’s just important to consider the property taxes and maintenance that go along with purchasing a home beforehand, as these added costs might end up making for a poor investment if they’re too costly.

Saving Money On Insurance

You may have heard many different things about the percentage your down payment should be, but because you will have to pay mortgage default insurance if you put less than 20% down, it can be an added boon to borrow the additional funds needed. While borrowing the money can be great in terms of lowering your monthly payment and making your home less costly in the end, it can also cause financial strain for you since you’ll have to pay back the funds over time.

Testing Your Relationships

It goes without saying that money can often times get between people, and when it comes to borrowing a significant sum of money from family or friends, this can improve your relationship or even cause a rift. While you may be willing to take this risk if you have no concerns about paying those who have lent you money back, if something arises and you’re unable to give back the funds, this can create issues that may be more problematic than renting a little longer.

Many people consider borrowing the money for their down payment in order to come up with the 20%, but it’s important to consider what borrowing this money can mean for your financial future and your personal relationships. If you’re currently looking into a new home, you may want to contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

Can You Get a Mortgage after a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Discharge? Yes – But You’ll Have to Wait

If you’re currently undergoing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and are wondering how this will impact home ownership, here are the basics on this type of bankruptcy and what it may mean for you.

Can You Get a Mortgage after a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Discharge? Yes - But You'll Have to Wait There was a time when it was possible to acquire a mortgage shortly after filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, but with the shifts in the financial sector, the timeline on such a mortgage approval has changed in recent years. If you’re currently undergoing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and are wondering how this will impact home ownership, here are the basics on this type of bankruptcy and what it may mean for you.

What Is Chapter 7?

While a Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the kind of financial situation that requires debt repayment, Chapter 7 is different in that it involves the liquidation of an individual’s personal assets to pay back the debt that is owed. A trustee will be designated to take care of the bankruptcy process, but a Chapter 7 bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for 10 years and have a negative impact on your credit score, which can mean increased interest rates on a mortgage down the road.

Re-Building Your Credit Score

The most important step to obtaining a mortgage following a Chapter 7 bankruptcy is keeping on top of your credit. Because your credit score will be lowered and bankruptcy will remain on your report for a long time, paying all of your bills on time in full and ensuring every aspect of your financial health is in check is of primary importance. Since most lenders will not even consider your application if you’re delinquent with payments, impeccable form is necessary in this case.

The Timeline On A Mortgage

According to the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), anyone applying for a mortgage must wait a minimum of two years after the discharge date of their Chapter 7 bankruptcy, which is the date they are cleared of obligation to their debt. While this is good news for those who want to apply for a mortgage in the near future, it’s important that a good credit history is developed and all FHA requirements are met to ensure approval.

Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy can be a hard financial pill to swallow, but by keeping your credit history in check for the duration of the 2-year period, you can be well on your way to a mortgage approval. If you’re planning on being on the market for a home in the near future, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information about opportunities in your community.

Leveraging LPMI: The Pros and Cons of Lender-Paid Mortgage Insurance

If you’ve heard the term Lender-Paid Mortgage Insurance (LPMI), this is when the mortgage lender pays off mortgage insurance on behalf of the homeowner. While this kind of insurance can be beneficial for some homeowners, here are some of the basics on LPMI so you can determine whether or not it will work for you.

Leveraging LPMI: The Pros and Cons of Lender-Paid Mortgage InsuranceFrom interest rates to mortgage loans, there are many things associated with applying and obtaining a mortgage that are important for new homeowners to be aware of. If you’ve heard the term Lender-Paid Mortgage Insurance (LPMI), this is when the mortgage lender pays off mortgage insurance on behalf of the homeowner. While this kind of insurance can be beneficial for some homeowners, here are some of the basics on LPMI so you can determine whether or not it will work for you.

It Can Be Tax Deductible

While a homebuyer generally has to be in a position of good credit in order to utilize LPMI, it is also the case that it is more beneficial for those in a higher income bracket. Because of the higher interest rate that is associated with this insurance, there is often the benefit of a more sizeable deduction when tax time comes. However, those with a lower salary may be able to deduct their Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) without even utilizing the costlier option of LPMI.

The Length Of Your Loan

Because of the higher interest rate associated with an LPMI loan, utilizing this option is generally only a good idea for those who are planning on paying their loan off in a shorter period of time. While other types of insurance will allow you to cancel the premiums once you’ve paid enough down on your home, LPMI works differently and will be in place until the entire loan amount is paid off in full. For streamlining payments, it’s ideal, but only if you have an end date in mind.

Do You Have Good Credit?

Due to the higher costs that are associated with LPMI, there’s a good chance that those who are not in the best financial standing will not even be eligible for this insurance option. While those who have a low debt load and a good credit score may be able to acquire this type of insurance, LPMI will not be feasible for the less financially sound.

While Lender-Paid Mortgage Insurance can be a good option for those who have a good credit score and are high income earners, it’s important to be aware of all of your options before you decide what type of insurance will work best for you. If you’re currently on the market for a home and are looking into mortgage options in your area, contact your local mortgage professional for more information.

3 Different Types of Loan That Will Negatively Impact Your Ability to Get a Mortgage

A good credit rating is built on a number of financial factors including paying your bills on time and the length of your credit history, but loans can also be a source of bolstering your credit score in a positive way.

3 Different Types of Loan That Will Negatively Impact Your Ability to Get a MortgageA good credit rating is built on a number of financial factors including paying your bills on time and the length of your credit history, but loans can also be a source of bolstering your credit score in a positive way. While this means that loans can actually be a good thing, there are also the kinds of loans that can have a damaging impact on acquiring a mortgage. If you’ll soon be pursuing your own home purchase, here are some loans that may have a negative impact.

Borrowing For Education

When you are young, student loans are an ideal means of paying down your debt and developing a positive credit history. However, if these loans are left to linger they can have a marked effect on your chances of a mortgage approval. Since paying back your student loans will be one of the first times in your financial life that you’ll be able to prove your reliability, you should ensure you pay them on a consistent basis in order to lower your overall debt-to-income ratio.

Credit Card Debt

Many people don’t think of the purchases that go on their credit card as loans, but the money on your credit card does not really belong to you until it’s paid off. While credit cards can be a great boon for establishing your credit in the early days, if you rack up a lot of credit card debt and do not pay your minimum payments by the due date, it will cause a considerable dip in your credit score. In addition, taking on too many cards can be a negative signal to lenders.

Payday Loans

In recent years, payday loans have sometimes been broken out separately from other loans on a person’s credit report. However, unlike many other types of loans, payday loans can be seen in a bad light by lenders because they can be indicative of someone who’s experienced significant financial setbacks, which would negatively impact their ability to pay a mortgage. While some mortgage lenders will not decline an application due to payday loans, some have already started to take this step.

Acquiring loans can be a good means of developing a credit history, but there are types of loans that may look bad on your mortgage application and won’t be of service if you can’t pay them off consistently. If you’re considering submitting a mortgage application, contact your local mortgage professional for more information.

Spouse with Bad Credit? 3 Reasons You’ll Want to Consider a Co-signer for Your Mortgage

If you’re concerned about what bad credit will mean for your mortgage and are weighing your options, here are some reasons why it might be important to use a co-signer for your application.

Spouse with Bad Credit? 3 Reasons You'll Want to Consider a Co-signer for Your MortgageObtaining a mortgage can be quite a complicated process even without the financial hurdles, but if your spouse’s credit has experienced a number of difficulties, acquiring a mortgage can be even more of a burden. If you’re concerned about what bad credit will mean for your mortgage and are weighing your options, here are some reasons why it might be important to use a co-signer for your application.

Increasing The Likelihood Of Approval

From getting an education to purchasing your first vehicle, it’s a common occurrence for people to take a loan out at some point in their life. However, getting a loan can be very difficult if you happen to be married to someone with a poor credit history. While having someone you know co-sign your application is not without its risks, it can be a means of securing mortgage financing so that you can move towards a less burdensome financial situation.

Improving A Bad Credit History

It adds stress to the process if you have a partner with a poor credit history, but the benefit of a co-signer is that it can be one of the few opportunities you’ll have to really improve a problematic rating. With a co-signer to vouch for you, you will be able to pay down your mortgage consistently and slowly build your spouse’s credit in a way that will give both of you a lot more financial opportunities in the future.

Building Up Trust

It goes without saying that having a co-signer can be a significant financial risk for the person who chooses to sign for you, but – if approached responsibly – this can be a means of building trust with your family members or friends. While co-signing may be a necessity for your situation, it’s important to be aware that it’s a huge commitment for the person who agrees to it and their support should be seen for the good faith it is.

As co-signing is a considerable responsibility for the person who offers it, it’s important to ensure that purchasing a home is the right financial choice for you before asking someone to vouch for your application. If you’re currently in the process of looking for a new home, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information.