The 10-year Mortgage: Why a Shorter Amortization Period Can Be Your Best Option

From ‘down payment’ to ‘adjustable rate’ to ‘debt-to-income’ ratio, there are so many terms involved in the mortgage process that it can be hard to learn them all and keep them straight. If you’re currently considering the period of loan you should choose, here are some things to think about before taking on a term.

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The 10-year Mortgage: Why a Shorter Amortization Period Can Be Your Best OptionFrom ‘down payment’ to ‘adjustable rate’ to ‘debt-to-income’ ratio, there are so many terms involved in the mortgage process that it can be hard to learn them all and keep them straight. However, whether or not you’ve heard it, the term ‘amortization period’ might be one of the most important ones associated with your financial well-being. If you’re currently considering the period of loan you should choose, here are some things to think about before taking on a term.

What Is Amortization?

Used to refer to the length of time it takes to pay off your mortgage loan, a typical amortization period is 25 years. However, there are many periods over which homebuyers can choose to pay off their mortgage. While many homeowners opt for what works best for them, it can be the case that a shorter mortgage period will actually be more financially beneficial in the long run. It may not only mean lower overall costs, it may also mean financial freedom from a loan much sooner than originally anticipated.

The ‘Principal’ Of The Matter

It’s important to have a monthly mortgage payment amount that’s sustainable, but a shorter amortization period means that you will be paying a higher amount on the principal and paying more on the actual loan amount. While a longer amortization period will add up to more interest payments and less paid on the loan cost each month, a shorter period can end up costing you less for your home when all’s said and done.

Considering Your Loan Period

It goes without saying that a shorter amortization period will pay down the principal sooner and cost less over time, but that doesn’t mean that it’s the best choice for you. Because your monthly payment will be taking a sizeable chunk out of your salary, it may be difficult to swing a higher payment in order to pay off your loan in 10 years. If it’s doable without compromising your quality of life, you may want to choose this option, but if there’s too much sacrifice you may want to opt for a longer loan period.

Everyone has a choice in the amortization period that works for them, but it’s important to make your decision based on what works for you and will be beneficial for your finances. If you’re currently getting prepared to invest in a home, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information.

Understanding Mortgage Amortizations and Why Longer Periods Can Cost More

Buying a home is one of the largest investments you will make in your life, and that’s why so many people have longer mortgage amortization periods to pay down the principal. While it may seem appealing to have a longer amortization period, here’s why an extended loan term can end up costing you more and may be less financially beneficial when it comes right down to it.

Understanding Mortgage Amortizations and Why Longer Periods Can Cost MoreBuying a home is one of the largest investments you will make in your life, and that’s why so many people have longer mortgage amortization periods to pay down the principal. While it may seem appealing to have a longer amortization period, here’s why an extended loan term can end up costing you more and may be less financially beneficial when it comes right down to it.

About Mortgage Amortization

Generally speaking, a 25-year mortgage amortization period can be typical, but there are many loan periods that a homebuyer can choose for amortization. While a longer-loan period may seem enticing because it will mean a smaller monthly payment, a shorter amortization will enable you to own your investment sooner, which can be a great boon for many people. It’s worth being aware of what works best for you as this will depend on your financial situation.

Paying Off The Principal

For those who have a high monthly payment, a longer mortgage period can seem like a benefit. However, while this will lower your monthly payment, it also means that you will be paying less on the principal over time and this can cost you when it comes to interest. A shorter loan period, on the other hand, may force you to re-do your budget to make the monthly payment, but you’ll be paying more on the principal each month and less on interest over time. A 25-year term may sound good at first, but a shorter term may be more financially lucrative in the long run.

What Works Best For You?

It may seem like a shorter loan period is the right financial decision, but there are a lot of factors that go into determining what will work best for you. If your interest rate is low and you’re struggling to make your monthly payment as it is, a longer loan period may be for the best. However, if you have the money in the bank and you can still live your life while saving a little bit extra, a shorter loan period may be an option that saves money in the end.

On the surface, a longer loan period and a shorter monthly payment may seem optimal, but it’s important to weigh all of the variables before deciding on your mortgage amortization. If you’re currently getting prepared to invest in a home, you may want to contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.